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TrendyGator

Junior Defender
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  1. In the latest installment of the Meet The Trendy Team series, intern Matt Arnold interviews Josh Isom, community manager at Trendy Entertainment, about his experience at Trendy, how he began working in the gaming industry, and more. Hey, Josh. Can you tell me about yourself? Sure! My name is Josh Isom. I’m 21 years old. I’m a journalism senior at the University of Florida. I love NBC Thursdays. I have a major crush on Ruth Wilson. I wish people were nicer to each other. I believe video games are a near-perfect platform for storytelling. (I still think books are better.) I wish I could live in Murakami’s version of our world. I’m saddened by the portrayal of women in video games. I can’t remember the last time I went a week without eating fast food. I would let Matt Damon do terrible things to me. How long have you been the community manager at Trendy Entertainment? I’ve been a community manager here for seven months, but I’ve been with the company doing community management support for a year. When our former (and sexier) community manager, Justin Danford, left to chase other pursuits in January, Jeremy and Phil asked if I wanted to join the team and get paid and everything. I’m totally making bank now, as you can see from my ‘98 Chevy Malibu. 13-inch spinnas, y’all. Is this your first job in the gaming industry? Yep! I went to college to become a video game journalist, but somewhere along the way that changed. I’m very grateful to be given this opportunity. I’ve never had a job so challenging or fulfilling before. How long have you been playing video games? What are your all-time favorite games? I’ve had a video game system in my house since I was born. I don’t remember the first time I played a game, but the earliest memory in my life was calling someone a b**** in DuckTales on the NES. Good times. I really love Dungeon Defenders. I honestly do. I feel awkward when I try to get my friends to play it because I feel like I’m pressuring them to play a game that I work on. Other than Dungeon Defenders, I love the Halo series. Halo was where I first experienced video game hype. My obsession for Reach news almost ruined my relationship with my girlfriend. I’ve learned to calm it down since then. (But Halo 4 is just around the corner. Eek!) There’s a special place in my heart for The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker. I challenge anyone to find a 1080p video of The Wind Waker and tell me that it’s not the most beautiful game ever made. It’s a living, breathing cartoon. Link’s eyes and the way they emote expression still makes me giddy. As a community manager, what are some of your daily tasks? I’m in charge of many things: our official forums, Facebook page, Twitter account, our Steam forums, the IRC chatroom, live events on Twitch, community events, event rewards, lost player data and email support. I’m very grateful to have LauraWantsaCow and IceArrow on team, who help me tackle the workload. I couldn’t do a fourth of my daily tasks without their support, and I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention how much I appreciate their efforts. I couldn’t ask for two stronger or more capable workers. I’m also in charge of moderating the moderators. (Who watches the watchmen? Me. That’s who.) And I oversee the community-hosted events. What are your favorite aspects of community management? Why? I love that I get paid to have meaningful conversations about what I love most: video games. I love the freedom of my job. I love that I get to take the feedback from the community and turn it into something tangible in the game. I just wish I had more time in the day to do everything I want to do. Based on what you’ve experienced so far, is community management what you expected it to be? At first, no. During my first month as community manager, I had to break some pretty tough news to our console fans. I was pretty depressed about that for awhile. But since then, it’s been almost exactly like I wanted it to be. In the office, who do you coordinate with the most? What departments do you interact with on a daily/weekly basis? I work with every department in the office -- marketing, development, QA, art, level design, corporate and, of course, the community team. It’s my job to be as knowledgeable about our game as possible. I take that job seriously. I work the closest with Phil, our marketing director, since our jobs have the most overlap. How did the DunDef Digest come about? What sparked your idea to begin posting weekly updates for fans in form of this digest? For the past decade, I’ve been reading the Bungie Weekly Update. I would run home from school on Fridays, start the dial-up process (the dreaded 56k!) and get a snack ready before diving into the update. It’s a ritual that made me a diehard Bungie fan, even when my love for Halo was hit-or-miss. Back in October, while I was an intern I started the Forum Week in Review, where I gathered all of the biggest news and best forum posts and put them into one convenient location. I suggested that we take the idea and make it bigger, similar to the Bungie update where we revealed news through the update itself. That spawned the Dungeon Digest, which became the DunDef Digest. Our former (and sexier) community manager, Justin Danford, handled Digest duty until he left back in January. When coming up with a community event, what process do you usually go through? When creating a Trendy-hosted event, I think about how I would want to play the game if I didn’t have access to all the fun tools I have at my disposal. And when that fails, I look to the forums to see what people would want to play. The last event, Raining Ogres, was inspired by a community member’s suggestion to make Ogres rain from the sky like in Raining Goblins. Unfortunately, that idea didn’t quite turn out the way I wanted it to, so I thought it’d be fun to troll people by letting our hosts spawn Ogres all over the place. Turns out, the game can’t handle 200+ Ogres spawning at once. Who knew? As for the community-hosted events, we leave that entirely up to the creative collective of the community. To help bring people to their events, we create unique items for them to give out. It’s time-consuming, but I hope the community appreciates the effort. How do you come up with new event weapons and items? Do members from the community contribute? Event weapons and items spawn from the community. Laura and I make sure that these items won’t break the balance of the game before delivering them to the hosts. Can you tell me anything about Trendy Entertainment’s next project? Absolutely. Not. I will say that my stomach starts to flip and my inner geek gets excited when I hear about it. What have been some of your favorite moments while working at Trendy? I love our company gatherings. We went to the midnight premiere of The Avengers as a team. Like Danny said in a previous Meet the Team interview, I wish we went out to lunch more often like we used to. Fun story: As soon as Danny completed his interview, I coordinated another team lunch. Once the team starts to wind down on current projects, it’ll be easier to get the gatherings going again. What advice can you give to someone interested in pursuing a community management position in the gaming industry? Find a major that focuses on writing. (Except English. Most English majors can’t use a comma properly, and it’s frustrating.) A community manager’s main task is writing. If you can’t communicate properly, nobody is going to hire you. Journalism is a great major for this. It teaches the most important rule of communicative writing: accuracy. People rely on you for accurate information. You cannot afford to be wrong. Plus, journalism teaches concise writing. Short, simple sentences are the clearest way of sharing information. Community managers need to be the biggest contributor to a community, so find a community that you’re interested in and participate. Write positive articles based on that community or find exemplary members to interview. These are perfect for a portfolio. Practice your social media management. Start a community blog and develop a Facebook and Twitter following for it. Most importantly, develop positive relationships. This is the most critical part of community management. People need to like you, they need to be able to interact with you, and they need to feel valued by you. This is a great rule for life in general. Like Conan O’Brien said, “Nobody in life gets exactly what they thought they were going to get, but if you work really hard, and you’re kind, amazing things will happen.”
  2. I was doing a trade with Bishop100- my laser robot for a clean mentor, clean lil carnage and a clean gunslinger. We both hit start once. Didnt hear anything after that. We checked our item box and non of our items that we traded was in our item box. Now i know if you hit start twice your item will disappear. But none of us did that. Please help!! I have responded to the email you sent to Lost Heroes. Check it and hopefully we can arrange a time to meet next week to solve this issue!
  3. This week, intern Matt Arnold interviews Danny Araya, lead concept artist at Trendy Entertainment. Danny’s work includes the new cinematics from the Lost Eternia Shards and the hero wallpapers from launch. He is currently working on certain future projects for Trendy. Read on to learn more about his job, his experiences at Trendy and more. Hi, Danny. First off, can you give me a little bit of background information about yourself? "Hey, my name is Danny Araya, I'm 26 years old, and I draw things for a living. I was born and raised in the Washington D.C. area and pretty much stayed there up until I got this job. I got my B.F.A in Media Arts and Animation from the Art Institute of Washington, but I pretty much have been drawing since I was a kid." How long have you been working at Trendy? "I've been working here about 15 months." How did you get your start in the gaming industry? "Trendy's actually my first in-studio job. The current art director, Ben Greene, and I had hung out once back in D.C. during a sketch crawl with some of the local game studio artists. Now in case you're wondering, a sketch crawl is pretty much exactly what it sounds like. You get together with a bunch of people and hop around from one location to the next, sketching all the people and scenery around you. Ben and I kept in regular contact through emails and Skype, and when an opening popped up, he was gracious enough to pass my portfolio along to the higher-ups. They dug it and had me do contract work for a few months before moving me on-site and making me a full time employee." What does the job of lead concept artist entail? What are some of your daily tasks? "Well, the obvious answer is a lot of concept art, but the bigger part of my job is working with the lead environment artist and the art director to maintain a consistent aesthetic throughout the game. We have a very specific style we're shooting for in future projects, and it can take a bit of time making sure that every 3D asset maintains the look we're aiming for. In terms of generating concepts, it can be ridiculously taxing. The drawing part is pretty easy, but coming up with new ideas on a daily basis can be draining. I work in a large room with most of the other artists, and I'm extremely grateful for this. The unique thing about Trendy is that the majority of us have become friends since working here, so I'm comfortable enough with the other artists and the art director to just start talking about what I'm working on and pick their brains for ideas. Talking and joking is also VERY important. Joking around with each other is actually how we come up with the bulk of our best ideas. That sort of friendly, light-hearted atmosphere makes people comfortable with sharing ideas and creates an environment that's extremely conducive to creativity. A lot of the time, an idea that was meant to be just a joke sparks a conversation that leads to a dozen awesome ideas that are directly applicable to the game." What is unique about being a concept artist? How is it different, for example, than a technical artist? "Drawing, drawing and drawing. A lot of the guys have to create something from nothing, whether it's a new special effect, a model with no prior concept, the arrangement of a level. The only difference between those guys and myself is that I use sketches and paintings to do it, where they use other tools." As one of the members of the original development team that launched Dungeon Defenders, what was the experience like for you when the game was first released to the public in October of last year? "To be honest, the bulk of what I had been working on at that time were the illustrations for the Crystal Shards cinematics. I did very little work on the original Dungeon Defenders aside from some promo illustrations and a handful of concepts." What was your favorite cinematic to draw? "My favorite cinematic was definitely the first panel of the Aquanos intro. It gave me the opportunity to draw an expansive ocean and to spend a bit of time rendering water and clouds. Painting monsters and OMG SWORDZ is fun and all, but I actually really enjoy painting natural environments. Mountains, clouds, cliffs, oceans are relaxing and fun to render." What would you say has been your proudest moment while working at Trendy? "Seeing what we're accomplishing with our latest project. We struggled really hard to get the style right for this game, and seeing it come alive and look even MORE beautiful than we anticipated is a feeling I can't describe. I really can't wait for everyone to see it." What is your inspiration when it comes to creating new concept art? What triggers your creativity? "Working around the people that I work with, it's hard not to get inspired just by having a conversation! We talk movies, art and games all the time with each other as we're working, which only serves to make us more excited about what we're working on. The question I constantly ask myself when creating anything is, 'What's the game I want to play that nobody has made yet?' I approach it with the intention of satisfying my own aesthetic preferences (within reason) and go from there. Some specific sources of inspiration for me though are almost anything made by Pixar, animated shorts from the Gobelins school in Paris, FFVII (dominated my middle school years and is the reason I got into games in the first place), anything directed by Edgar Wright, most things written by Aaron Sorkin, almost ALL the artists on CGHub. I could honestly keep going on and on, so I'm going to be kind and stop here." Your work was recently featured in IGN and Kotaku. Can you talk about that experience? "Haha. Well this kind of came out of the blue. A while ago ago I did a series of concept designs where I re-imagined some of the Justice League the way I would portray them if I were to direct a JLA animated movie. I posted them online along with some very detailed descriptions about how I saw the characters' personalities and why I made the decisions I made regarding the designs. Fast forward two years later, and Bleeding Cool did an article praising my approach, which was a HUGE ego boost. I was really happy that they dug it, but all of a sudden, articles kept popping up all over the internet. IGN, Kotaku and a host of other places picked it up. It was humbling, but also extremely awesome, and my ego hasn't come back down to earth since." Looking back on the time you’ve spent at Trendy, what are some of your fondest memories? "There was a time where almost all of us would go out to lunch together on a daily basis. That doesn't happen as often as it used to anymore, and a lot of those people have since moved on to pursue other opportunities. I miss that." Who is your favorite character from the Dungeon Defenders universe? "The monk, because we're both bald with serious eyebrows." What are your most anticipated games coming out later this year? "These days it's pretty rare for me to get excited about a game. Working in this industry, your time outside of work is precious because you have so little of it, so I'm very picky about the games that I play. I'm really really really really really big on story, and unfortunately most games out right now don't satisfy me in that department. Some people say it's impossible for games to even do that, but I feel like plenty of games (VALVE) disprove that ridiculous notion, I just think it requires a different approach to storytelling. The last game I was strongly looking forward to was Journey. I played it, and it didn't just meet my unreasonably high expectations, it significantly exceeded them. That game is in my top five favorite games of all time, but unfortunately I haven't felt passionately about a game since." Finally, what is the best advice you would give to aspiring concept artists? "Draw. A lot. Take the time to learn the technical side of art (perspective, anatomy, proper rendering of form with light and shadow) but DON'T neglect your ideas! Do everything you can to foster your creativity because at the end of the day, your ideas are the only real unique thing you have." Thank you for your time! "Thank you!" To see more of Danny's work, check out his blog, Art of Araya.
  4. In this second Meet The Trendy Team interview, our community intern, Matt Arnold, speaks with Rodrigo Lizarraga, multimedia designer at Trendy Entertainment, about his job, electronic music and more. Hey, Rodrigo. First off, can you tell us about yourself? "Hi! My name is Rodrigo Lizarraga, multimedia designer here at Trendy, and I like turtles." Is this your first job in the gaming industry? "No, I worked as a UI/graphic designer at Ignition Studios." What brought you to Trendy? "I used to work with Jeremy [Stieglitz] and a few others at Ignition. They needed a graphic designer again for this new company, Trendy Entertainment, and contacted me. Been here ... two years now!" When it comes to working as a multimedia designer, what are some of your daily tasks? "The fun part about my job is that I get to dip my hand in all sorts of things. I work on nearly every single piece of marketing material that we pump out for Dungeon Defenders. One day I'll be doing assets for Xbox Live, Steam or PSN; another day I'll be working on the trailer for our latest DLC. Currently, I am working on the in-game 2D cinematics for the fourth Eternia Shard DLC!" Any hobbies you enjoy doing while not at work? "I DJ around town a lot. It's a fun hobby, a good creative outlet, and I get paid to do it!" I noticed that you do graphics-related work for local clubs and electronic artists on the side. How does your passion for electronic music manifest itself in these projects? "I'm a pretty hardcore EDM snob, and the type/style of music that the artist plays helps inspire how I visually design for them." What computer programs do you typically use for your work? "I wouldn't have a job without the entire Adobe suite of products. Mostly Photoshop, After Effects and Premiere. <3 Adobe." Finally, based on your experiences while working at Trendy, what advice do you have for those interested in becoming multimedia designers in the gaming industry? "The key is to be a jack of all trades when it comes to this kind of job. I know the Adobe product line better than my own name!"
  5. If the weapon is too good to be true, it probably is. Also, event weapons are the most likely to be duped.
  6. Hey bl1nk, Sorry that you feel this way. You shouldn't because we look into every account before banning someone and we only ban those who deserve it.
  7. This pic should be nominated for the Digest. Agreed, very cool pic!
  8. Yeah i get but sucks anyway. I have to give up maybe i will catch up with the videos that are saved in twitch too see the summoner in action... You will be able to access the archive of the livestream after it is over. :)
  9. Well is great ideia for the the players to see the new stuff and to attract new people to the game trough the stream, but streaming in +720p or more and not having a way to choose less quality it's not so good how about the people with bad internet? Hey GeniusBug, Unfortunately, only those with a partnership with Twitch.tv can enable the feature that allows viewers to choose a lower quality than 720p+. At the moment, we are not yet partnered with Twitch due to the fact that we have just started up the livestream page.
  10. The stream is live right now! Stop by http://www.twitch.tv/trendyent to get a sneak peek of the new Dun Def Hero, The Summoner, as well as get a chance to win a Summoner DLC code! For those on Twitter, tweet out a link to the stream along with the hashtag [[1463,hashtags]] to spread the word!
  11. In the first part of a new behind-the-scenes series, our intern, Matt Arnold (@GearsGator), interviewed Alex Fundora, lead animator at Trendy Entertainment, to discuss his job, how he began working in the video game industry and more. Hey Alex, tell me a little about yourself. "Hey, my name is Alex Fundora, Lead Animator here at Trendy Entertainment. I'm 25 years old, was born in Buffalo, New York, but moved to Florida a few years later and lived here almost my whole life since. I received my BFA in Computer Animation at Digital Media Arts College in south Florida." How long have you been an employee at Trendy Entertainment? "So far, I've been working with Trendy for about 2 years." How did you get a job at Trendy? "I first discovered Trendy while browsing through some modding forums a few years ago. At the time, Trendy was working on a prototype version of the game which was originally titled Dungeon Defense.' It was a really fun concept for a game right from the start, so I quickly got in contact with Jeremy, the Creative Director, which eventually kickstarted some contract work." Prior to working at Trendy, did you work at any other video game companies? "After a few months of contracting with Trendy, I made a full-time switch to a popular game studio known as Bethesda Game Studios. There, I was an animator for The Elder Scrolls: Skyrim. It was a great trip, though I quickly discovered that their type of work and games didn't reflect my personal interests as much as I would have liked. So I got in contact with Jeremy again and was offered a full-time Lead Animator position back at Trendy, which I couldn't refuse." What is a typical day in the life for you at work? "I start the day off by riding our half-broken elevator up to the top floor of the building. The unrythmic jolting and noises inside the elevator gives you just the right kick to not need coffee in the morning. I then walk down a long hallway and pass many rooms which include: Public Relations, which many times houses a puppy or some animal that demands petting; the beta testers room for which I get to be jealous that they play videogames all day; the programmers room a.k.a. Mordor, which no artist enters even with a double-salary incentive; my Art Director Ben's room, which I stop in every morning to tell him he's a sexy beast; and then finally the artists room where I go to my desk a.k.a. The Valve Shrine (see picture). The rest of the day I usually stare out the window or sometimes do work." As a lead animator, what are some specific contributions you have made to Dungeon Defenders? "I have my hand in just about everything animated for the game including characters, world assets, in-game cutscenes and promotional cinematics." What is your proudest moment from working at Trendy? "My proudest moment was when the full Dungeon Defenders game was finally released for console and PC, knowing that everything that I was responsible for was technically flush and artistically interesting." What are some of the challenges you have experienced getting in and staying in the video game industry? "The most difficult detail was figuring out how to develop my portfolio for job hunting. Different studios are looking to fill different types of animation jobs, so developing a reel that covered a broad spectrum of animation was the key. I find that many students are too confident that they know exactly what they want to do and develop a very narrow portfolio ... when entering the industry. This can make finding work difficult, even for the talented. Once here, it is a lot easier to focus on something more specific." Do you prefer to animate 2D or 3D art and why? "I really enjoy the appeal and freedoms from traditional animation, though with digital animation, it allows the animator to focus more on the shot and performance of the character and not worry about the high demands of technical consistency that would be required with 2D." What are some of the pros and cons with using the Unreal Engine 3? "Working with Unreal Engine 3 is amazing. It has a very straight forward design which makes working with new content fast and easy. The engine also has a very powerful and dynamic cinematics department which helps fuse ambition for us animators. The only con from working with the Unreal Engine is that I can't keep up with all of its consistently awesome updates from Epic Games." Who is your favorite hero in Dungeon Defenders? "My favorite hero is definitely the Huntress. Her traps which have solid utility and damage coupled with some evasion perks make her a fun and effective teammate." Outside of Dungeon Defenders, what are some other games you enjoy playing? "It is no secret here at Trendy that I am a huge follower of Valve Software. I've been playing their titles for over half of my lifetime so far and are what initially sparked my interest in game development, which eventually led to my career as an animator. Nowadays, I play lots of Team Fortress 2 and Dota 2. Brownie points for Grand Theft Auto, Trine and Torchlight." What advice do you have for someone interested in being an animator in the gaming industry? "Not just for animation, but for any 3D discipline, it is very important to have a strong traditional art background. Even if drawing will never be applied on a practical level with your specific career choice, traditional art teaches you how to compose an idea without all the technical jargon. It is very important, so don't let your sketchbooks collect dust." Thank you for your time!
  12. In the first part of a new behind-the-scenes series, our intern, Matt Arnold (@GearsGator), interviewed Alex Fundora, lead animator at Trendy Entertainment, to discuss his job, how he began working in the video game industry and more. Hey Alex, tell me a little about yourself. "Hey, my name is Alex Fundora, Lead Animator here at Trendy Entertainment. I'm 25 years old, was born in Buffalo, New York, but moved to Florida a few years later and lived here almost my whole life since. I received my BFA in Computer Animation at Digital Media Arts College in south Florida." How long have you been an employee at Trendy Entertainment? "So far, I've been working with Trendy for about 2 years." How did you get a job at Trendy? "I first discovered Trendy while browsing through some modding forums a few years ago. At the time, Trendy was working on a prototype version of the game which was originally titled ‘Dungeon Defense.' It was a really fun concept for a game right from the start, so I quickly got in contact with Jeremy, the Creative Director, which eventually kickstarted some contract work." Prior to working at Trendy, did you work at any other video game companies? "After a few months of contracting with Trendy, I made a full-time switch to a popular game studio known as Bethesda Game Studios. There, I was an animator for The Elder Scrolls: Skyrim. It was a great trip, though I quickly discovered that their type of work and games didn't reflect my personal interests as much as I would have liked. So I got in contact with Jeremy again and was offered a full-time Lead Animator position back at Trendy, which I couldn't refuse." What is a typical “day in the life” for you at work? "I start the day off by riding our half-broken elevator up to the top floor of the building. The unrythmic jolting and noises inside the elevator gives you just the right kick to not need coffee in the morning. I then walk down a long hallway and pass many rooms which include: Public Relations, which many times houses a puppy or some animal that demands petting; the beta testers room for which I get to be jealous that they play videogames all day; the programmers room a.k.a. Mordor, which no artist enters even with a double-salary incentive; my Art Director Ben's room, which I stop in every morning to tell him he's a sexy beast; and then finally the artists’ room where I go to my desk a.k.a. The Valve Shrine (see picture). The rest of the day I usually stare out the window or sometimes do work." As a lead animator, what are some specific contributions you have made to Dungeon Defenders? "I have my hand in just about everything animated for the game including characters, world assets, in-game cutscenes and promotional cinematics." What is your proudest moment from working at Trendy? "My proudest moment was when the full Dungeon Defenders game was finally released for console and PC, knowing that everything that I was responsible for was technically flush and artistically interesting." What are some of the challenges you have experienced getting in and staying in the video game industry? "The most difficult detail was figuring out how to develop my portfolio for job hunting. Different studios are looking to fill different types of animation jobs, so developing a reel that covered a broad spectrum of animation was the key. I find that many students are too confident that they know exactly what they want to do and develop a very narrow portfolio ... when entering the industry. This can make finding work difficult, even for the talented. Once here, it is a lot easier to focus on something more specific." Do you prefer to animate 2D or 3D art and why? "I really enjoy the appeal and freedoms from traditional animation, though with digital animation, it allows the animator to focus more on the shot and performance of the character and not worry about the high demands of technical consistency that would be required with 2D." What are some of the pros and cons of using the Unreal Engine 3? "Working with Unreal Engine 3 is amazing. It has a very straight forward design which makes working with new content fast and easy. The engine also has a very powerful and dynamic cinematics department which helps fuse ambition for us animators. The only con from working with the Unreal Engine is that I can't keep up with all of its consistently awesome updates from Epic Games." Who is your favorite hero in Dungeon Defenders? "My favorite hero is definitely the Huntress. Her traps which have solid utility and damage coupled with some evasion perks make her a fun and effective teammate." Outside of Dungeon Defenders, what are some other games you enjoy playing? "It is no secret here at Trendy that I am a huge follower of Valve Software. I've been playing their titles for over half of my lifetime so far and are what initially sparked my interest in game development, which eventually led to my career as an animator. Nowadays, I play lots of Team Fortress 2 and Dota 2. Brownie points for Grand Theft Auto, Trine and Torchlight." What advice do you have for someone interested in being an animator in the gaming industry? "Not just for animation, but for any 3D discipline, it is very important to have a strong traditional art background. Even if drawing will never be applied on a practical level with your specific career choice, traditional art teaches you how to compose an idea without all the technical jargon. It is very important, so don't let your sketchbooks collect dust." Thank you for your time!
  13. ....and lead us not into Boredom, but deliver us from STEAM Downtimes. For ours is Etheria , and the Towers, and the Loot, for ever and ever. Ogerbelly Lol, this is awesome! :squire:
  14. I got messaged back the next day from lost hereos sent them a message on thursday got a reply friday messaged again on the friday because they asked for my gamertag in there reply and i have yet to receive another message, how long does it take or is there just no hope at all for me to get my event weapons back ? Hey Michael, I have just responded to your Lost Heroes email. We will just need to arrange a time to meet online.
  15. Hey! Can you post a link to this player’s Steam profile page as well as a screenshot for evidence so that we can properly look into their profile/ban them if necessary? Thanks!
  16. Hey! Can you post a link to this player’s Steam profile page so that we can properly look into their profile/ban them if necessary? Thanks!
  17. I have banned this player for selling items for USD. Thanks for reporting this and keep up the good work!
  18. Hey! It seems like the screenshot you posted no longer exists. Would you be able to post a new updated one along with a link to the player's Steam profile page? Thanks!
  19. Hey! Thanks for reporting this player! Can you post a screenshot for evidence? Thank you!
  20. Hey! Thanks for reporting this player! We are looking into it now. Keep up the good work!
  21. Thanks for reporting this! We looked into this player's profile but found no hacked weapons. Keep up the good work!
  22. Hey! Can you post a link to this player’s Steam profile page so that we can properly look into their profile/ban them if necessary? Thanks!
  23. Do you know who sold you the item? If you post their Steam profile page and a screenshot of their hacked items, I can look into their profile and possibly ban them. Thanks!
  24. Hey! Can you post a link to this player’s Steam profile page (the profile you posted could not be found) as well as a screenshot for evidence so that we can properly look into their profile/ban them if necessary? Thanks!
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