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Shadows7398

Thinking about getting a Pc..

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I really want a PC for Dungeon Defenders 2. Just wanted to know, Does anyone know what is a good PC to get to play Dungeon Defenders on? By the way, I never had a PC before. So, I thought I could try and ask on the fourm.

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well biggest thing is budget and if your gunna get a pc build one yourself. do some google research for a pc build common ones usually are like 500,750 and 1000 dollers for everything u need to build a pc.

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You can build a crazy good PC for less than $500-$600 (US,) one that will run any games at 1080p and the highest quality settings with ease (as well as viewing/encoding full HD video and other cool stuff with ease.) The key is to research and compare components, and many sites have charts that make this user-friendly. Especially the processor, graphics card, etc. Having a higher model number isn't always better; some of the best parts can also be the cheapest.

They even have some great pre-built computers from companies like Dell. As long as you research it heavily; the ones with the right combo of parts are very hard to find, and most pre-built computers will be lacking in a key component like the graphics card or processor. They do make them with perfect setups, though; they're just a few hundred bucks pricier than if you built it yourself. For the convenience, though, it could be worth it. You can also have a company like CyberPower custom-build a PC for you.

It's a good financial move, considering the upcoming console generation. Most of the best indie game developers have moved to Steam, and a good chunk of the "AAA" stuff shows up there as well nowadays. All with achievements, native controller support, leaderboards, and the other things you loved from console play. But the games on Steam tend to be available for so much cheaper, and often go on sale. So in the long-run, it's a cheaper endeavor than a PS4/XB1 would be.

Not to mention the original DunDef on Steam is amazing. It's a totally different world from the console port, and any console players would do well to play the PC version next. While we wait for the DD2 co-op mode, which is still quite a long ways off.

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You can build a crazy good PC for less than $500-$600 (US,) one that will run any games at 1080p and the highest quality settings with ease (as well as viewing/encoding full HD video and other cool stuff with ease.) The key is to research and compare components, and many sites have charts that make this user-friendly. Especially the processor, graphics card, etc. Having a higher model number isn't always better; some of the best parts can also be the cheapest.

They even have some great pre-built computers from companies like Dell. As long as you research it heavily; the ones with the right combo of parts are very hard to find, and most pre-built computers will be lacking in a key component like the graphics card or processor. They do make them with perfect setups, though; they're just a few hundred bucks pricier than if you built it yourself. For the convenience, though, it could be worth it. You can also have a company like CyberPower custom-build a PC for you.

It's a good financial move, considering the upcoming console generation. Most of the best indie game developers have moved to Steam, and a good chunk of the "AAA" stuff shows up there as well nowadays. All with achievements, native controller support, leaderboards, and the other things you loved from console play. But the games on Steam tend to be available for so much cheaper, and often go on sale. So in the long-run, it's a cheaper endeavor than a PS4/XB1 would be.

Not to mention the original DunDef on Steam is amazing. It's a totally different world from the console port, and any console players would do well to play the PC version next. While we wait for the DD2 co-op mode, which is still quite a long ways off.
Do you think I could make one, I'm 11 BTW? I got like a $1000, so I should be good money wise.

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Do you think I could make one, I'm 11 BTW? I got like a $1000, so I should be good money wise.


I would definitely get adult help bud. Even as an adult myself, I would still get a friend to help.

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Do you think I could make one, I'm 11 BTW? I got like a $1000, so I should be good money wise.


you probably could with help, its weird some of my friends say its very simple to make one because they looked up instructions and my other friends say "get someone who knows what they're doing"

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putting a computer together is easy, it just requires handling knowledge. stressing boards and connecting things incorrectly can lead to bad times.

there are pros and cons to what shin said, but its mostly right. but mainly, when it comes to buying prebuilt over custom built, you always have to consider a monitor. prebuilt often times will not include one, even though when you look online they will always show a monitor in the picture. it just doesnt look good to most consumers to only see a tower when looking for a computer. i dont know how its possible, but a lot of people still think that a computer and a monitor are synonymous...

anyway, that bit aside, there are 6 key things to remember when you start looking at building/buying a computer: motherboard, CPU, graphics card, ram, hard drive, and monitor, and yes, that is pretty much the order of importance. average price for each is 120, 120, 90, 50, 75, 150, so consider that about 600 is the minimum to get you started. from there, its knowing what to buy.

again, as shin said, dont buy the newest stuff on the market, it is an extravagant waste of money. why? if it came out yesterday and the game you want to buy comes out tomorrow, chances are the game was not developed on the new stuff so you are just buying wasted potential. as a general rule, when you buy part for a computer, 1.5 to 2.5 years ago technology is generally the ideal timeframe to look at. it is a lot cheaper, and more importantly it gives a much higher return per dollar invested.

and for that reason, i strongly discourage buying prebuilt. companies like dell and hp have their wondrous licensing deals where they push subsidized product like cellular phone services do.

you will also need a DVD drive, but those things are seriously about to the point where companies pay you to take them...

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Very good advice from Vanilla Ice (that also rhymed, inadvertently.) ^_^ And yes, with a thousand bucks, you can definitely afford one with a decent amount to spare. I can't stress enough, however, to research it as much as possible before making any decisions on parts buying. There's no need to be hasty with an investment like this, as a good choice will last you for many years.

There are loads of great comparison websites, all with very simple charts and graphs. Most of them will have graphs that compare cost versus effectiveness of a part (like a graphics card,) along with other popular cards on the market, side by side. And you'll notice that a lot of the pricey stuff isn't even that amazing; as V.Ice said it has a lot to do with how new they are. A lot of the best stuff is at the lower end of the price spectrum (around $100 for many of the best processors and graphics cards.)

And if you have access to friends who have experience doing it, always ask around for advice. Don't necessarily take advice from vendors, if they vendor has a vested interest in selling a certain line. But there are lots of stores with on-site techs (like Tigerdirect and their subsidiaries) where you can find one of them to give advice without charging for it. Although as with anything in life, never take one person's opinion on what to buy as definitive fact. Never hurts to get multiple opinions.

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If you're going to buy it to experience Dungeon Defenders 2, I would wait until the game is officially released, and THEN buy a computer. Then you'll get best bang for your buck imho. :)

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Without a change in engine you can pretty easily bet that the requirements will not be much more for DD2 than they are for DD. That said Trendy could always increase the actor (items in game) count which would increase both the graphics and processing loads. But most game companies shoot for the lowest common factor and requiring everyone to have i7 cpus and top of the line graphics cards is detrimental to selling lots of games.

That said building you own pc can be very rewarding in it's own right. Even though I have been building my own pc's since 1983, i always take the time to read up on the latest tech before each new build / upgrade. Some of my fav sites are Anandtech and Tom's Hardware, but there are plenty more good sites out there. Also don't forget that you will need to buy a copy of the OS (operating system) unless you go with something like Linux. But you should look for a student discounted version if you go with Microsoft Windows (assuming student discounts are not just for college students - not sure about that). The two biggest pieces of advice I'd give is never force a connection, and always discharge static electricity before touching bare parts.

A good guide to start with is https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=2&ved=0CDsQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.tomshardware.com%2Freviews%2Fpc-gaming-overclock-build-a-pc%2C3443.html&ei=cJnRUYPcPIa-9gSetoDoBA&usg=AFQjCNF8hfaKAhDmriX6AFyn4op6w25Paw

They do updates every so often so you can keep up with the latest so when you decide to pull the trigger you get the best you can.

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