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Why do YOU think the devs are afraid to talk about what they are working at?


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To specify, why do YOU think the devs are afraid to tell more specifics of their ideas and what they are currently trying to achieve?

The only answers I have seen the last months have been vague, barely any info at all. As others have posted, asked for and repeatedly done so. Is for more in depth info on what is going on.

Sure they have said they are working at X, Y and Z. But there has literally been 0= zero, information on how and what that X, Y and Z is... In terms of their thinking and design decisions.

Were pretty much blind to the whole process until it is released. Sure I could off signed up for testing the new hero, but until I know what will change in terms of base mechanics and systems in the game. Personally I have no interest in it..

I am not asking for numbers, charts and game play videos.

"Trendy working at balance between towers" What does that mean? - Does it mean numbers will be changed? Mechanics of towers? New towers? Targeting issues being fixed? Overkill from single target towers?

I could probably make a list of the same questions for every part of the game, but I just dont want to write a essay.. 


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Why do YOU think the devs are afraid to tell more specifics of their ideas and how they are currently trying to achieve them?

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I think it is mainly because they know the changes are not inline with what we have been asking for. If they tell us in advance that it's not what we want then they know we will just put off playing.

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And this way we stop playing cos it`s boring and the news are unexciting.
They should`av listened while they could.

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I've witness some intesting things in videogame history over the years. One of the things people always seem concerned with is this. There are 2 major ways it seems to play out which ultimately makes complete transparency bad for developers.


1. Devs show off a new feature, but then realize they don't want to/can't continue developing it so they drop it. They let their fans know and "big surprise" the fans all get angry and whiny about it. One of the biggest examples of this was the development of Diablo 3. Because of Diablo 3, Blizzard is no longer transparent about most of their behind-the-scenes plans for their games. It is better to show what you have, than what you want to have but don't.


2. It kills any potential good surprises they might have had by being transparent. Sometimes if you show everything in your game before you make it, you have nothing left to give everyone. There is nothing left to keep people hyped, or if the game is already out then there is nothing for the players to figure out on their own. There are games like Pokemon and Minecraft that would have not been interesting at all if there was nothing to find out.


TL;dr You can satisfy some people some of the time, but never everyone all of the time.

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I think it's because everyone there has their own ideas they'd like to see and they know they'd get flak from inside the studio if they were parading their ideas around while knowing full well nobody knows whose idea will be used until 'last minute' 

I'm basing this off the fact that we still see in devlogs certain people complaining about meetings and the fact that there's a history of changes that essentially contradict each other's purpose which leads me to believe more than 1 grand vision/philosophy is having a significant impact on the game


I think it's much more likely they're divided within the studio and that's causing the opaqueness vs they're united with the intention of purposely obfuscating what the community knows


Edit: oh, and recent layoffs + management shifts lead me to believe this as well

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Staying silent on the matter is far worse.

Look at some of the stealth buffs that just happen in the weekly patches.

Some of them are quite significant, but not a word was said. Lets take the newest buff to Onslaught, that's a step in the right direction and they could of hyped some people up with a welcomed change for once.

However nothing was said.

It's an odd way to make your game. You hype up crap no one asked for ie Carnival Update and you stay quiet on  something that will help improve one of your main game modes.

Trendy are a weird bunch at times, 


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Going to have to agree with GreenDragon on this one.  Its most likely an issue of not wanting to tip their hat plus needing to be able to change things that don't work without the community loosing there minds.  Every little thing they say or do, even when bracketed with "hope. might. Maybe one day" all get taken as the gospel word of Trendy and that it will happen.  I know Trendy has a history of working hand-in-hand with the community but there are somethings that just have to be handled in-house to keep the game on a stable course.

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I think it's more around something like GreenDragon says.

Offering some harder insight kinda "binds" them to it and often the community is very hardcore and take anybit it can to actually defame and flame a change. It could be used against them. So if it was a bad idea overall but some player like it, they would recive alot of flame then if they change it for the better overall picture.

Also often alot of people in the producing industry keep stuff secret simple for a psychological phenomena. If you pull out ideas right at the beginning, the mind goes into a state of "it's out". It is a huge difference if you say something out or not, really.

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@KnowsNoLimits quote:


It's an odd way to make your game. You hype up crap no one asked for ie Carnival Update and you stay quiet on  something that will help i prove one of your main game modes.



That's sad but true. The carnival looked good at first. But after playing several times I think that milestone was a total waste of time and made the playerbase more angry than no milestone at all. The best acknowledgement to the current flaws would have been a milestone that focused on fixes of current features rather than implementing a new zero-strategy-map.

"The maps are too simple? Let's implement a carnival map where you HAVE to turtle all the time."

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@Dreizehn quote:


@KnowsNoLimits quote:


It's an odd way to make your game. You hype up crap no one asked for ie Carnival Update and you stay quiet on  something that will help i prove one of your main game modes.



That's sad but true. The carnival looked good at first. But after playing several times I think that milestone was a total waste of time and made the playerbase more angry than no milestone at all. The best acknowledgement to the current flaws would have been a milestone that focused on fixes of current features rather than implementing a new zero-strategy-map.

"The maps are too simple? Let's implement a carnival map where you HAVE to turtle all the time."

The biggest issue I had with the Carnival update for me personally was that it prioritized over more important things that could of been addressed in that time.

Tower re-balancng, Hero Deck changes, Match making fix.

Dark Assassin got over shadowed by this crap?

How embarassing.

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@GreenDragon quote:

I've witness some intesting things in videogame history over the years. One of the things people always seem concerned with is this. There are 2 major ways it seems to play out which ultimately makes complete transparency bad for developers.


1. Devs show off a new feature, but then realize they don't want to/can't continue developing it so they drop it. They let their fans know and "big surprise" the fans all get angry and whiny about it. One of the biggest examples of this was the development of Diablo 3. Because of Diablo 3, Blizzard is no longer transparent about most of their behind-the-scenes plans for their games. It is better to show what you have, than what you want to have but don't.


2. It kills any potential good surprises they might have had by being transparent. Sometimes if you show everything in your game before you make it, you have nothing left to give everyone. There is nothing left to keep people hyped, or if the game is already out then there is nothing for the players to figure out on their own. There are games like Pokemon and Minecraft that would have not been interesting at all if there was nothing to find out.


TL;dr You can satisfy some people some of the time, but never everyone all of the time.

  There are also ways transparency can help developers, like keeping us interested even though most people don't really like the current state of the game. And as for these cons, I don't see them as real issues. For starters, the fans are already angry and whiny from the current state of the game and the lack of transparency. I think the odds favor less whining with more transparency. Even if they do whine there aren't that many people on DD2 right now, and it's not like it's getting far on word of mouth anyway.

  As for killing the surprise I don't see how this is any bit of an issue. You're right, there are games like Minecraft, that would be totally killed by knowing to much about them before playing. But that's not DD2. Minecraft has a heavy reliance on exploration aspects in it, dungeon defenders never did. With a well made strategy element, there will still be new stuff to do, builds that haven't been tried, and if the combat system is revamped, there could also be some focus on a fun action element. This stuff won't be hurt hard by early reveals.

@KnowsNoLimits quote:

Staying silent on the matter is far worse.

Look at some of the stealth buffs that just happen in the weekly patches.

Some of them are quite significant, but not a word was said. Lets take the newest buff to Onslaught, that's a step in the right direction and they could of hyped some people up with a welcomed change for once.

However nothing was said.

It's an odd way to make your game. You hype up crap no one asked for ie Carnival Update and you stay quiet on  something that will help improve one of your main game modes.

Trendy are a weird bunch at times, 


Wait what happened to onslaught? Can you point me to something on this?

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@braydon180 quote:


@GreenDragon quote:

I've witness some intesting things in videogame history over the years. One of the things people always seem concerned with is this. There are 2 major ways it seems to play out which ultimately makes complete transparency bad for developers.


1. Devs show off a new feature, but then realize they don't want to/can't continue developing it so they drop it. They let their fans know and "big surprise" the fans all get angry and whiny about it. One of the biggest examples of this was the development of Diablo 3. Because of Diablo 3, Blizzard is no longer transparent about most of their behind-the-scenes plans for their games. It is better to show what you have, than what you want to have but don't.


2. It kills any potential good surprises they might have had by being transparent. Sometimes if you show everything in your game before you make it, you have nothing left to give everyone. There is nothing left to keep people hyped, or if the game is already out then there is nothing for the players to figure out on their own. There are games like Pokemon and Minecraft that would have not been interesting at all if there was nothing to find out.


TL;dr You can satisfy some people some of the time, but never everyone all of the time.

  There are also ways transparency can help developers, like keeping us interested even though most people don't really like the current state of the game. And as for these cons, I don't see them as real issues. For starters, the fans are already angry and whiny from the current state of the game and the lack of transparency. I think the odds favor less whining with more transparency. Even if they do whine there aren't that many people on DD2 right now, and it's not like it's getting far on word of mouth anyway.

  As for killing the surprise I don't see how this is any bit of an issue. You're right, there are games like Minecraft, that would be totally killed by knowing to much about them before playing. But that's not DD2. Minecraft has a heavy reliance on exploration aspects in it, dungeon defenders never did. With a well made strategy element, there will still be new stuff to do, builds that haven't been tried, and if the combat system is revamped, there could also be some focus on a fun action element. This stuff won't be hurt hard by early reveals.

@KnowsNoLimits quote:

Staying silent on the matter is far worse.

Look at some of the stealth buffs that just happen in the weekly patches.

Some of them are quite significant, but not a word was said. Lets take the newest buff to Onslaught, that's a step in the right direction and they could of hyped some people up with a welcomed change for once.

However nothing was said.

It's an odd way to make your game. You hype up crap no one asked for ie Carnival Update and you stay quiet on  something that will help improve one of your main game modes.

Trendy are a weird bunch at times, 


Wait what happened to onslaught? Can you point me to something on this?

Patch 10.6

Nightmare IV Onslaught loot drops now grow to the current max iPWR as intended.

Enjoy.

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